Physics, SciComm, Space, youtube

Kepler’s Laws

Johannes Kepler was one of the last pre-telescope astronomers, plotting the movements of the stars and planets across the heavens, taking advantage of the clear, dark skies of the late 1500s/early 1600s before cities became clouded with light and smog in the industrial revolution. Under the mentorship of (and money from) Tycho Brahe, Kepler analysed… Continue reading Kepler’s Laws

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Space, Spaceflight

The Decade in Spaceflight

Rocket technology has come a long way since the start of the decade, with the rise of commercial spaceflight and integration of public and private agencies. It began with the end of an era. The space shuttle program was NASA’s longest running mission series, with its first launch way back in 1981. The program was… Continue reading The Decade in Spaceflight

Space

The Decade in Space Exploration

This decade has perhaps been the most pivotal since the 1960s/70s, in terms of space exploration, both crewed and uncrewed! (to read more about the development of human spaceflight, click here) We maintained our continuous presence in space, with 41 missions to the International Space Station, ranging in length between 64 days and a year!… Continue reading The Decade in Space Exploration

Space, Spaceflight

The Artemis Generation

50 years ago, the world was awestruck as the space race fuelled innovation at a speed not yet seen before, resulting in the first human setting foot on the moon just a decade after the first satellite was launched! But as the cold war and  threat of nuclear attack fizzled out with the fading US-Russia… Continue reading The Artemis Generation

Space, Stargazing

Why is Mars so bright? And other things to see in the October sky

You look out your window in the evening to the south and spot a brighter-than-usual red 'star'. It moves across the night sky and is setting/has set by morning. In fact, it is not a star, but Mars! A hastily snapped photo when I realised it was just peaking through the clouds! (ISO 6400, shutter… Continue reading Why is Mars so bright? And other things to see in the October sky

Astrobiology, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Space

Aliens on Venus?

All you need to known about the discovery of Phosphine in Venus' clouds! EDIT: The findings have since become into doubt after independent review of the data, but the science behind the potential discovery I discuss here is still interesting! I will do a blog post on some other linked discoveries soon, which I will… Continue reading Aliens on Venus?

Astrobiology, Space, Spectacular Scientists

Spectacular Scientists: Jasmine S

Look at this! Another Spectacular Scientists feature! I really love these posts, as hearing about everyone’s journey is so interesting and motivating! I hope it inspires you/ you find it helpful as much as I do! Jasmine is also a science communicator, and is studying my favourite topics- planetary science (particularly atmospheres) and astrobiology! She… Continue reading Spectacular Scientists: Jasmine S

SciComm, Space, Spectacular Scientists

Spectacular Scientists: Joalda Morancy

Welcome back to my spectacular scientists series! It’s been a while, but we are kicking it off again with Joalda- also known as @solarrsystem on Twitter- she creates the most amazing threads about all kinds of space-y things. Some are mainly educational, covering fascinating topics like wormholes, space agriculture, and asteroid mining, but also less… Continue reading Spectacular Scientists: Joalda Morancy

Space, Spaceflight

Why is Mars so hard to land on?

This summer is chock-full of exciting missions to Mars, with China’s Tianwen-1 and the UAE’s Hope orbiter already en route to Mars, and NASA’s Mars 2020 set to launch on July 30th. ESA was also meant to launch its Rosalind Franklin Exomars rover, but that was delayed to 2022 earlier this year. I’ll talk more… Continue reading Why is Mars so hard to land on?